The retina is the part of the eye that senses light and translates images into signals sent to the brain. The eye’s lens focuses images onto the retina and then sends the image data to the brain via the optic nerve. When retinal degeneration occurs, seeing properly becomes difficult, if not impossible, and that makes it harder to live a healthy, happy life.
Chart showing the parts of the eye

Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years old in the U.S. It is a condition involving the macula, which is the center part of the retina, and leads to loss of detailed vision. When the macula is affected, you may have difficulty reading, driving, and seeing faces. You may find it significantly harder to do near-work, such as threading a needle, or you may not be able to distinguish small objects, like salt crystals in a salt shaker. Other symptoms include distorted vision and “photo-stress response” (such as “snow blindness”) as a reaction to bright light.

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Diabetic Retinopathy

Between 80 to 85 percent of diabetics will develop some degree of retinopathy during their lifetime. Those with Type I diabetes are more likely to develop the condition than those with Type II. If patients with diabetic retinopathy are treated properly before the retina is severely damaged, there is an excellent chance of stabilizing the disease and stopping the progression.

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Diagnosing and Treating Retinal Conditions

Our retinal specialists use the most advanced techniques and technologies to determine what’s keeping you from seeing clearly. When it comes to retinal conditions, we make sure you have the most effective and customized treatment plan available.
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